Dorm Room Project 7th Grade

Dorm Room Project by Kim Moore

dormroom

Students participate in a project where they design their own dorm room.  They also are given a budget to buy items such as bedding and decorations to bring to personalize their room.

Below is a list of all you should need for the project.

Overview of Project

Scoring Guide

Shopping Spree

Dorm Room Dimensions

Chart and Graph

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Specific Seventh Grade TEKS Addressed:

(7.3) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving direct proportional relationships. The student is expected to

(A) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving percent; and Readiness Standard

(7.2) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, or divides to solve problems and justify solutions. The student is expected to

(B) use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve problems involving fractions and decimals; Readiness Standard

Financial Literacy TEKS Addressed:

Seventh Grade:

13 (A)  calculate the sales tax for a given purchase and calculate income tax for earned wages;

(F)  analyze and compare monetary incentives, including sales, rebates, and coupons.

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Extreme Makeover: Aquarium Edition

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TEKS:

Grade Six:

(3)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving direct proportional relationships. The student is expected to:

(A)  use ratios to describe proportional situations;

(B)  represent ratios and percents with concrete models, fractions, and decimals; and

(C)  use ratios to make predictions in proportional situations.

Grade Seven:

(3)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving direct proportional relationships. The student is expected to:

(B)  estimate and find solutions to application problems involving proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit costs, and related measurement units.

(9)  Measurement. The student solves application problems involving estimation and measurement. The student is expected to:

(A)  estimate measurements and solve application problems involving length (including perimeter and circumference) and area of polygons and other shapes;

Grade Eight:

(3)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student identifies proportional or non-proportional linear relationships in problem situations and solves problems. The student is expected to:

(B)  estimate and find solutions to application problems involving percents and other proportional relationships such as similarity and rates.

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Timeline: 2-3 days

Instructional Focus: Ratio and Proportion, Scaled Drawing and Measurement

Hook:  Texas State Aquarium Video

Driving Question(s):

What are ratios and proportions?  How are they used to create scaled drawings in architecture?  How do you find the area of two dimensional figures including rectangles, trapezoids, shapes and composite figures?

Challenge Brief Details:

You are to design an Aquarium floor plan.  Include the pools, tanks, and other displays listed, plus any that you personally want to add. Arrange all the tanks against the walls. The circular pools or tanks need to be placed in the middle of the floor plan.

Problem Requirements:

Materials:

Supporting Materials:

Rubrics:

This rubric will be shared with students at the beginning of the activity.  The teacher will refer to the criteria as they facilitate the students working through this problem.

Here is the Extreme Makeover Scoring Rubric

 

 

Real Life Stories

Proportional Reasoning in Real-Life Stories

by Annalee Martinez

View or Download Complete Activity Here

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TEKS

Seventh Grade:

(7.3) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving direct proportional relationships. The student is expected to

(B) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit cost, and related measurement units.

(7.5) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses equations to solve problems. The student is expected to

 (B) formulate problem situations when given a simple equation and formulate and equation when given a problem situation.

Eighth Grade TEKS:

(8.3) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student identifies proportional or non-proportional linear relationships in problem situations and solves problems. The student is expected to

    (A) compare and contrast proportional and non-proportional linear relationships.

[/peekaboo_content]Timeline: 2 days

Instructional Focus: Proportional and non-proportional relationships, multiple representations.

Hook: Show video on a teenager with cancer raising money.


Driving Question: What is the different characteristics of proportional and non-proportional relationships?

Challenge Brief: In this investigation, you will determine whether three real-life stories: Race for the Cure, Buying Computers, Party at the Bowling Alley, describe proportional or non-proportional relationships by creating and examining tables of data and the related equation and graph that represent each story.

Project Requirements:

1. For each story

  • Construct  a data table
  • Create a graph of the data
  • Write  an equation that corresponds with the data in the table and graph
  • Answer the guiding questions

2. Creative Display of Work: Chart Paper

Note: Each group will be assigned a specific scenario.

  • Write your scenario in large print.
  • Include the data table, graph, and equation.
  • In your own words, explain if the real-life scenario represents a proportional or non-proportional relationship.

3. Participation in Class Discussion

Materials:

Other Resources/Related Activities:

Rubric:

 

 

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty by Eugene Alvarez

This is an interdisciplinary lesson on the story of the Statue of Liberty.

Timeline: 2-3 days

Instructional Focus:  Measurement, Average, Proportion and Scaling (Grade 7)

Hook:

    • The Story of the Statue of Liberty by Betsy and Giulio Maestro.
    • Video of the book being read

Driving Question:  How do I research information I do not know?  How do I measure height of a person accurately?  How do I find average/mean?  How can I use proportions to find the answer to a problem that I cannot physically measure?

Challenge Brief:  In this investigation, you will determine about how many 7th graders it will take, if stacked on top of each other, to be as tall as the Statue of liberty.  In order to do this assignment, you will need to identify the height of the statue and find the height of the ‘typical 7th grader’ by finding the mean height of the class.

Problem Requirements:

  1. Identify height of statue.
  2. As a group, measure and record heights for each student in class.
  3. Calculate the mean height of a ‘typical 7th grader.’
  4.  Using this information, ratios, and proportions to determine how many 7th graders it would take to reach the height of the actual statue.
  5. Students would turn in findings with all work related to solving the problem.
  6. Extension: Using scaling, determine dimension to create a proportionally small model of the statue. Possibly construct or draw it.

Note:  This problem can be adapted for any grade level with adaptations for age appropriateness and ability.

Rubric & TEKS

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TEKS

  • use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve problems involving fractions and decimals;[7.2B]
  • estimate and find solutions to application problems involving proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit costs, and related measurement units.[7.3B]
  • use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems in fields such as art and architecture.[7.8C]
  • estimate measurements and solve application problems involving length (including perimeter and circumference) and area of polygons and other shapes;[7.9A
  • describe a set of data using mean, median, mode, and range[7.12A]
  • identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;[7.13A
  • use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;[7.13B]
  • select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper / pencil, and technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems.[7.13D]

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Travel Project 7th Grade

The students goal is to pick a destination somewhere in the continental United States and plan out a vacation, including researching and calculating the most efficient means of travel.

 

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TEKS

Seventh Grade:

(2)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, or divides to solve problems and justify solutions. The student is expected to:

(A)  represent multiplication and division situations involving fractions and decimals with models, including concrete objects, pictures, words, and numbers;

(B)  use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve problems involving fractions and decimals;

(D)  use division to find unit rates and ratios in proportional relationships such as speed, density, price, recipes, and student-teacher ratio;

(3)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving direct proportional relationships. The student is expected to:

(A)  estimate and find solutions to application problems involving percent; and

(B)  estimate and find solutions to application problems involving proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit costs, and related measurement units.

(12)  Probability and statistics. The student uses measures of central tendency and variability to describe a set of data. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe a set of data using mean, median, mode, and range

 

(G)  determine the reasonableness of a solution to a problem.

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Click here for rubrics and other information related to this project.